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Videos

Check out our videos showing our hands-on habitat conservation efforts!

Coral Conservation | Deepwater BP Oil Spill | Fish Passage | Wetlands Conservation


Deepwater BP Oil Spill

Deepwater BP Oil Spill

Assessing the Damage, Restoring the Coast

Learn more about what’s next for the BP oil spill as we move into the Natural Resource Damage Assessment.

Coral Conservation

Florida Keys Earth Day Event

Florida Keys Earth Day Event

NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco joins NOAA coral restoration staff and Recovery Act project partners as they tour the Wellwood restoration site at Molasses Reef in the Florida Keys. They examine transplanted staghorn and elkhorn corals and a large growth of established natural elkhorn coral at the site. The next dive visits a coral nursery to see the more than 3,000 corals growing just below the surface. They view line nurseries, cleaning stations, and new coral transplants and mount new staghorn cuttings onto mounting tables. Learn more about the Florida Keys Recovery Act restoration project.

Coral Forests of the Deep

Coral Forests of the Deep

To see more great videos from this collection, visit Ocean Today.

Maunalua Reef, Hawaii

Maunalua Reef, Hawai’i

In 2009, NOAA provided $3.4 million in Recovery Act funding to The Nature Conservancy to remove invasive algae from coral reef in Hawaii’s Maunalua Bay. This video tells the story of this project and the importance of not only hiring people to help restore the Bay, but inspiring a community of 60,000 to take care of our coral reefs and understand the dangers of invasive species. Learn more about the Maunalua Reef Recovery Act restoration project.

Fish Passage

Open Rivers, Abundant Fish

Open Rivers, Abundant Fish

To see more great videos from this collection, visit Ocean Today.

Merrimack Village Dam Removal

Merrimack Village Dam Removal, New Hampshire 2008 (Time Lapse)

This brief time-lapse review of the 2008 removal of Merrimack Village Dam allows you to explore the dramatic restoration of one of New Hampshire’s important river systems—the Merrimack River. The dam was one of a series constructed in the 1730s to generate power for a number of industries. Dams in this region helped control the water power for nail, cotton, and woolen mills, as well as carpet, furniture, and shoe factories. This was one of the largest and most complex dam removal projects NOAA ever attempted.

Whites Gulch Dam Removal

Whites Gulch Dam Removal, California 2008 (Time Lapse)

This is explosive time-lapse video of the dynamite removal of Whites Gulch Dam. Whites Gulch is located on the Salmon River, a tributary of the Klamath River, in Siskiyou County, California. Before NOAA helped remove it using explosives, it sat in the middle of thick vegetation and tree-lined streams, ideal for spawning salmon. The river was originally home to a large salmon population, supporting a salmon cannery and sportfishing, but the dam had blocked salmon from reaching upstream spawning habitat and populations were dwindling. Today, they’re making a comeback without Whites Gulch in their way.

Wetland Conservation

Gooseneck Cove

Gooseneck Cove, Rhode Island

This short film focuses on Gooseneck Cove, a 2009 salt marsh restoration in Rhode Island. This coastal habitat is one the most important ecosystems on earth, improving water quality, protecting our shorelines from erosion during storms, and providing vital food and habitat for a wide variety of wildlife species. Coastal marshes are especially important to many commercial and recreational fish and shellfish that use the marsh as a nursery and for its abundant food sources.

Magnolia Marsh

Magnolia Marsh, California

In 2009, NOAA provided $3.3 million in Recovery Act funding to the Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy to restore tidal flow at the Magnolia Marsh wetland. A year later, the ocean is successfully reconnected to the wetland and bringing back important nursery habitat for many fish, including California halibut. This video tells the story of this project and the importance of taking care of our wetlands, before they disappear. Learn more about the Recovery Act.

Magnolia Marsh

Magnolia Marsh Wetland Restoration, California 2009 – 2010 (Time Lapse)

This time-lapse video takes you on the long journey from what had become a dry and arid dump to the new wetland it is today. Using Recovery Act funding, the Huntington Beach Wetlands Conservancy restored tidal flow at the Magnolia Marsh wetland and successfully reconnected the ocean to the wetland to bring back valuable fish habitat.