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Oil & Habitat

As stewards of our nationís coastal, marine, and riverine habitat, we are concerned about the near and long-term impacts of oil spills and impacts on the ecology of these natural resources. Our job is to conduct studies to identify the extent of natural resource injuries, the best methods for restoring those resources, the type and the amount of restoration required to execute the resources and their habitat. NOAA leads a rigorous and thorough Natural Resource Damage Assessment, which is a legal process to identify injuries to coastal and marine natural resources, including marine and migratory fish, endangered species, marine mammals, and their habitat.

We work to ensure that habitat affected or lost due to an oil spill is allowed to flourish once again. NOAA expertise and science, paired with long-standing partnerships with local and academic organizations as well as public input, are critical to the long-term recovery of productive coastlines, vibrant fisheries, and thriving wildlife.

NOAA Habitat Conservation: Our Role in the Gulf

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  • General Facts—When Oil Meets Habitat

  • After a Spill—Effects of Chemical Dispersants on Habitat and Animals

  • Deepwater Horizon

  • Habitat in the Gulf of Mexico

  • Shorelines and Coastal Wetlands in the Gulf of Mexico

  • Staff Highlight

Deepwater Horizon: Photo Credit: US Coast Guard

 

NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab and NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco discuss sampling plans for future and ongoing vessel surveys with Dr. Walter Ingram of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center.
NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab and NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco discuss sampling plans for future and ongoing vessel surveys with Dr. Walter Ingram of the Southeast Fisheries Science Center.

 

NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab, and Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley assess how the sample is processed aboard the Research Vessel Caretta and chain of custody protocol used when handling specimens associated with the oil spill.
NOAA Administrator Dr. Jane Lubchenco, NOAA Fisheries Assistant Administrator Dr. Eric Schwaab, and Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley assess how the sample is processed aboard the Research Vessel Caretta and chain of custody protocol used when handling specimens associated with the oil spill.